The Most Incredible Wildlife Photos Of 2014

Justin Black/Wildlife Photographer of the Year

From the mightiest beasts in the jungle to the tiniest microorganisms swimming in our pond water, Earth is home to some amazing life-forms.

This year, we’ve observed some incredible wildlife in action all around the world.

In 2014 we saw leopards battling crocodiles, walruses swarming the Alaskan coastline, and ghostly fish lurking in the deepest parts of the ocean.

7 tips for improving your wildlife photography

Posted by Africa Geographic Photographer of the Year in Photography, Wildlife and the Africa Geographic Photographer of the Year post series.

The first in our series of photographic tips and gear reviews to set you on your way to becoming Africa Geographic’s Photographer of the Year

Corlette Wessels of Africa wildlife Photography believes that photography isn’t just a hobby, it allows us to capture a fleeting moment in time. That image that takes us back time and time again to the feeling, the texture, the emotion of that special moment in time. It’s not a piece of equipment or skill. It’s the cataloguing of lives, of a changing world and our connection to it.

Here are Corlette’s seven tips for creating a winning photo:

1. Know your camera

Photographic opportunities with wildlife do not occur in slow motion and most of time are unexpected and happen rather fast. You cannot sit there fiddling with the camera buttons trying to find the ideal setting when the action is taking place in front of your eyes. By the time you’ve figured it out, the action would have been long gone and you would have missed out on the ultimate shot.

See more at africageographic.com/blog/

World wildlife populations halved in 40 years – report

By Roger Harrabin
BBC environment analyst

The global loss of wildlife is even worse than previously thought, the London Zoological Society (ZSL) says in its new Living Planet Index.

The report suggests populations have halved in 40 years, as new methodology gives more alarming results than in a report two years ago.

The report says populations of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish have declined by an average of 52%.

Populations of freshwater species have suffered an even worse fall of 76%.

Read the full report